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Saturday, December 30, 2017

Weekly Utah Hay Market Report

Utah Hay prices prices mostly firm,with trading slow on all Quality's.  Majority of movement on previous contracts.  Lower  quality hay demand
is light with good supplies. Confirmed sales 1,000 tons.

Northern Area: Alfalfa: Supreme No I dairy: 120—140.00; Premium:
100.00—120.00; 
Good  Feeder:  80.00-95.00.  Fair: 60.00-80. 00; Low: No  Quote.
Premium retail horse sales 100.00—150.00.

Central Area: Alfalfa: Supreme # 1 Dairy 120.00—140.00; Premium
Dairy: 100.00—110.00; Good  Feeder: 80.00-90.00;   Fair: 60.00-
80.00; Low: scarce.  Oat Hay: No Quotes.  
Premium retail horse sales: 110.00—150.00.

Southern  Area:   Alfalfa:  Supreme  #1  Dairy:  120.00—150.00;
Premium 100.00—130.00;  Good Feeder: 80.00—93.00; Fair: 60.00—
80.00; Low: no quotes.

Uintah Basin:  Alfalfa: Supreme  Dairy: 100.00—130.00; Premium
Dairy: 90.00—100.00;  Good  Feeder: 75.00-90.00;  Fair: 50.00-
70.00; Low: scarce. Premium retail horse sales: 150.00-180.00.
Note:  Low  quality  hay can be weedy, or weather damaged or all.
Detailed Quotations Utah:(Bales — large and small in stack), last 
quoted sales are sales more than two weeks old.

Alfalfa Small and Large Square Bales last quoted sales
 Retail Horse (small lots) 150.00-180.00
 Supreme Dairy            130.00-150.00  last quote
 Premium Dairy             90.00-125.00  last quote
      Good                         75.00-85.00 
      Fair                        60.00-75.00
      Low                             n/q  

Friday, December 29, 2017

Rock Valley Hay Auction

For Thursday, Dec 28, 2017

Receipts:  48 loads    Last Week:  68 loads    Last Year:  109 loads    

   Compared to last week: Alfalfa and grass sold steady.  Prices dollars per 
ton, except where noted.  All sales FOB Rock Valley, Iowa, vicinity.  

One load Small Squares equals approximately 5 tons; Large Squares and 
Large Rounds range from 10-25 tons per load.

   Alfalfa:  Good: Large Rounds, 6 loads 130.00-150.00.  Fair:  Large Rounds, 7 
loads 117.50-127.50.  Utility: Large Squares, 2 loads 80.00-82.50; Large Rounds, 
3 loads 87.50-105.00.

   Grass:  Good: Large Rounds, 9 loads 125.00-137.50.  Fair: Large Squares, 1 
load 115.00; Large Rounds, 3 loads 120.00.  Utility: Large Rounds, 2 loads 
97.50-100.00.  

   Alfalfa/Grass Mix:  Good: Large Squares, 1 load 135.00; Large Rounds, 1 load 
125.00.  Utility: Large Squares, 1 load 85.00; Large Rounds 1 load 92.50.

   Oat Hay:  None.

   Rye Hay:  None.

   Millet Hay:  None.

   Straw:  Large Squares, 1 load 110.00; Large Rounds, 2 loads 95.00-100.00.

   Cornstalks:  Large Squares, 2 loads 42.50-45.00; Large Rounds, 6 loads 37.50-
47.50. 

2018 Outlook: Regional Economics to Influence Hay Prices Most

For many livestock species, alfalfa is a critical component of the diet. As we look to 2018, national hay prices aren’t expected to soar, but look for regional economics to play a heavy role in the price you pay at the farm gate.

Rising highway costs are making the expense of delivering hay more of a consideration, which is resulting in very regionalized hay prices, according to Dan Undersander, a member of the University of Wisconsin Madison forage team. The latest Agricultural Prices Report from USDA shows the national average price for alfalfa was $152 per ton in October. While it’s important to note that price is representative of all quality levels, let’s compare it to the average price in several states: $185/ton in California, $205/ton in Kentucky, $219/ ton in New York and $215/ton in Tennessee.
What causes these price differences? Undersander says it is a combination of regional economics and location.

The Midwest

Despite a rough start to the 2017 hay season, alfalfa stocks in the Midwest are doing ok.
“We had bad hay making conditions on the first cutting,” Undersander says. “On the other hand, we had pretty good tonnage the rest of the season. That will tend to keep prices pretty stable throughout the winter season.”
A growing dairy herd in the region is expected to support demand and prices. UW Madison Forages reported high quality dairy hay sold for an average of $190 per ton the week of December 3.

The South

Many southern states are experiencing drought. As a result, more hay is being fed to livestock because there isn’t forage to graze. Undersander says that’s eating into their hay supply.
“The region in the south is a one state area,” Undersander explains. “Because they are buying lower quality they can’t afford to haul it very far.”
Low stocks and burgeoning demand are driving prices higher.

The Northeast

Evidenced by the $219/ton average alfalfa price USDA is reporting in New York, hay prices in the Northeast were driven higher by drought in 2017. As a result they are going to be down on supplies. To make problems worse, the region is too far from commercial hay growing regions that might have an abundance of hay to make hauling in hay very profitable, Undersander explains. Instead, he says dairy farmers there will start replacing hay with corn silage as they did in California when hay prices there started to skyrocket in 2016.

The West

In California, the number of milk cows in the state is declining while alfalfa exports are soaring.
“January through September 2017 alfalfa hay exports from the west coast to China were 13% higher than the same period in 2016,” says Seth Hoyt, a hay market expert and author of the Hoyt Report.
In addition to China, there are growing markets in Japan, Saudi Arabia and UAE that are soaking up alfalfa hay from California. As a result, Hoyt says early indications are that there won’t be much excess hay carried into 2018 in the West.
“Much will depend on winter weather, particularly in higher elevation states where there was very heavy feeding of feeder hay to beef cattle last winter,” he says. “If we have similar weather again this winter, it would be expected that hay carryover would be down as it was on May 1, 2017.” 
Hoyt says it’s nearly impossible to predict hay prices in the West given the multitude of emerging price factors, but he anticipates the spread between dairy quality hay and lower quality hay to widen.
“There are quite a few dairies in central California that are carrying smaller than normal inventories of hay and will have light supplies of higher quality alfalfa hay on hand as we go into early next season,” Hoyt explains. “I believe the spread between the top and bottom of the alfalfa hay market will be wide, especially in central California where many dairies will feed by-product feeds to dry cows and less alfalfa hay if the price on fair quality dry cow hay is above $190-$200 delivered.”

Thursday, December 28, 2017

Nebraska Hay Summary

Week Ending December 29, 2017

  Compared to last week alfalfa and grass hay sold unevenly steady. 
Dehy alfalfa pellets sold mostly steady, instances 5.00 higher. Ground 
and delivered hay sold steady. Demand was slow for most offerings of 
baled hay and moderate to good for ground and delivered hay. Some users 
of ground products are stocking up this week due to the New Year’s 
holiday and preparing for the bitter cold this weekend. Some cattlemen 
are supplementing cows out on stalks was there is light snow on the 
ground and cold temperatures prevailing. Some ranchers continue to 
purchase alfalfa and grass hay for winter feeding needs. Quite a lot of 
dehy pellets continue to move across the state and into large feed mills 
for regrinding into other livestock feeds.   All sales are dollars per 
ton FOB the field or hay barn, unless otherwise noted. 
Wishing everyone a Happy New Year!!

Eastern/Central parts Nebraska
Alfalfa: Supreme large square bales 160.00-180.00, Premium large square 
bales 155.00-175.00, Good large square bales 120.00-135.00. Good to 
Premium large round bales 100.00-110.00. Good large round 75.00-85.00.  
Grass Hay: Good to Premium large square bales 90.00.  Good to Premium 
large round bales 80.00-90.00; fair large rounds 60.00-70.00. Premium 
small square bales of prairie hay 150.00. Cornstalk bales 50.00-55.00. 
Ground and delivered alfalfa 115.00.  Dehy Alfalfa pellets 17 percent 
protein 195.00-230.00. Sun-cured alfalfa pellets 15 percent protein 
190.00, 17 percent protein 195.00. 

Platte Valley area of Nebraska
Alfalfa: Fair to Good large square bales 155.00. Good large round bales 
85.00-95.00; Grass Hay: Large round bales 90.00-100.00; fair large round 
bales 55.00-60.00. Cane Hay large round bales 65.00-70.00. Cornstalk 
bales 50.00-55.00. Ground and delivered alfalfa 120.00-130.00. 
Alfalfa/Stover mix 115.00, Ground and delivered cornstalks 85.00-100.00. 
Dehy pellets 17 percent protein 195.00-200.00. 

Western and Panhandle area of Nebraska
Alfalfa: Premium large square bales 160.00-180.00; Good large square 
bales 120.00-140.00. Alfalfa/Orchard grass: Good to Premium large square 
bales 140.00-150.00. Orchard Grass: Premium large square bales 145.00.  
Ground and delivered alfalfa 130.00-135.00. 

Tuesday, December 26, 2017

What will 2018 hay prices look like?

This is always on the Top 10 question list this time of year. To be honest, it won’t be answered here because there’s still a multitude of unknowns that are . . . well . . . unknown.
What can be done is to examine what we do know and take a look at some of the factors that will help push prices up or down from their previous levels. From that point, I’ll take my guess. Here are a few thoughts.
December stocks:
Mark January 12 on the calendar. That’s when USDA will report its December 1 hay stocks tally. This number has gone up the past four years, but last year the rise was modest compared to the previous three. December 1 stocks will offer a good starting point of how well the market will withstand any hitches in the giddyup.
The report doesn’t differentiate based on forage quality. Even in years when stocks are strong, Supreme and Premium quality can remain in short supply. That situation is already known to be true in some parts of the United States as a large price gap is developing between the high and lower quality forages.
Acres:
In 2016, harvested hay acres were down 1.1 million acres from 2015. Forecasted acres for 2017 stand at 53.5 million, similar to 2016. USDA’s Annual Crop Production report on January 12 will offer a final number on harvested hay acres as well as production. We’ll also need to watch planting intentions next spring.
Exports:
Hay exports continue to strengthen, with China leading the surge. That country will import over 1 million metric tons of U.S. alfalfa during 2017. Total U.S. alfalfa exports through October were up over 11 percent from 2016. In addition to China, alfalfa hay exports to Japan, Saudi Arabia, and South Korea are all higher compared to last year. As was reported last week, Saudi Arabia will be looking to boost their import total as its government is turning off the water spigot for domestic alfalfa production.
Though exports make up less than 5 percent of the total U.S. production, that percentage is much higher when only the Western states are considered. Further, 10 years ago, the percentage of U.S. alfalfa hay exported was only 1.5 percent. The export market is definitely a competitor with domestic markets, especially in the West. It also acts as a destination for hay that would otherwise have to find a home in the U.S. or wouldn’t be produced at all. I think we can safely put exports in the category of supporting higher hay prices, especially in the West.
Dairy:
The nation’s dairy herd was 53,000 cows larger in November 2017 than it was the previous year. Year-over-year milk production has been higher in every month except one (February) during 2017. Milk prices in 2017 were higher than 2016, but still at levels that are barely profitable or worse.
Unfortunately, market experts are not painting a rosy milk price picture for 2018, especially during the first half of the year. The average milk price in 2018 could easily be below 2017. Those dairies that purchase hay may be less inclined to pay top dollar through winter. The ones producing their own forage generally have good supplies.
Beef:
The U.S. beef cow inventory was 32.5 million on July 1, 2017; that’s nearly back to levels of 10 years ago and up from a low of 29.1 million in January 2014. Most experts feel the herd will continue to expand in 2017, but at a lower rate than 2016. Beef prices have been better than expected even with the herd expansion. Bottom line: More animals continue to be fed each year, meaning a higher demand for hay or more hay acres.
Grains:
Corn and soybeans continue their sideways price trends at levels often below the cost of production. As competitive livestock feeds, it’s unrealistic to think that hay prices will return to extremely high levels until strength returns to the grain commodities. This has the dual effect of also taking existing hay acres out of production and tightening supplies. Short of some major weather phenomena, it’s unlikely that grain markets will move drastically in 2018.
Weather:
The biggest wild card remains weather conditions, beginning with the annual chance for alfalfa winterkill in Northern regions. Drought, persistent rains, and wildfires seem to be annual events these days, but usually are localized events with little impact on national hay price movement. However, a drought of the magnitude and scope of 2012 can change the entire picture. Of course, none of this can be predicted at this point. What we can be sure of is that somewhere there will be local hay prices significantly impacted by extreme weather events.
Where does that leave us?
The case for higher hay demand and stronger prices can be found in more animals (both dairy and beef) to feed, profitable beef prices, and the strong hay export market. The expectation for lower milk prices and little upside for commodity grain prices are reasons to think that hay prices may not have significant upside potential.
Hay prices strengthened in 2017 with high-quality hay selling for $40 or more per ton above 2016 levels. Further, the export timothy hay market was exceptional. Though prices may not retreat significantly in 2018, it’s hard to see a scenario where similar gains are made without a widespread weather-related event.
Finally, what seems to be true every year is that high-quality forage brings a premium price and high-yielding forage carries the best profit margin. Combine the two and you’ll nearly always hit the jackpot. Do what you can to first impact your own bottom line, then worry about the hay market.

Hay price, demand mixed across trading area

In Nebraska and the East River area of South Dakota, alfalfa, grass hay and ground and delivered hay sold steady. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets in Eastern Nebraska steady to $10 higher. Platte Valley area steady to $5 higher sold steady. Demand was moderate to good for most offerings of baled hay, according to the USDA Market News Service, Dec. 14. Prices given on per-ton basis, unless otherwise noted.
Eastern/central—Good/premium alfalfa, large squares, $150-$175, large rounds, $100-$110; good, large rounds, $85-$90. Premium alfalfa orchard grass, large squares, $165. Good grass hay, large squares, $90; large rounds, $80-$85; premium, large rounds, $85-$90; fair, large rounds, $60-$70. Premium, small squares prairie hay $150. Cornstalk bales, $50-$55. Soybean stubble, rounds, $45. Ground and delivered alfalfa, $115. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17% protein, $195-$230. Sun-cured alfalfa pellets, 15% protein, $190, 17% protein, $195.
Platte Valley—Fair/good alfalfa, large squares, $155; good alfalfa, large rounds $85-$90; fair, large rounds, $60. Grass hay, large rounds, $90-$100; fair, large rounds, $55-$60. Cane hay, large rounds, $65-$70. Oat hay, large rounds, $85. Cornstalk bales, $50-$55. Bean stubble bales, $55. Ground and delivered alfalfa, $120-$130. Alfalfa stover mix, $115. Ground and delivered cornstalks, $85-$100. Dehydrated pellets, 17% protein, $190-$200. Sun-cured alfalfa pellets, $170.
Panhandle—Premium alfalfa, large squares, $160-$180; good, large squares, $120-$140. Good/premium alfalfa orchard grass, large squares, $140-$150. Premium orchard grass, large squares, $145. Ground and delivered alfalfa, $130-$135.
East River area of South Dakota—Supreme alfalfa, small squares, $6.50/bale; premium, large squares, $170, small squares, $6/bale; good, large rounds, $150-$160; fair, large rounds, $125-$135; utility, large rounds, $80-$110. Sun-cured alfalfa pellets, 15% protein, $175, 17% protein $180. Alfalfa meal, 17% protein, $185. Premium alfalfa grass mix, large squares, $150; good, large rounds, $135. Good/premium grass, large rounds, $135; good, large squares, $125-$130, large rounds, $120; fair, large rounds, $110-$125. Wheat straw, large squares, $100. Cornstalks, large rounds, $45, $50 delivered short haul.
In Iowa, all class of hay sold firmer.
Rock Valley—Good alfalfa, large squares, $147.50-$152.50, large rounds, $150; fair, large squares, $120-$135, large rounds, $115-$127.50; utility, large squares, $95, large rounds, $105-$112.50. Good grass, large rounds, $110-$125; fair, large squares, $100, large rounds, $90-$107.50; utility, large rounds, $67.50-$87.50. Fair alfalfa grass mix, $97.50. Oat hay, none. Rye hay, none. Millet hay, none. Straw, large squares, $90-$100, large rounds, $60-$80. Cornstalks, large rounds, $35-$45.
In Minnesota, prices were generally steady.
Supreme alfalfa, large rounds, $115; premium, large rounds, $90; good, large rounds, $70; utility, large rounds, $35-$40. Premium grass, large rounds, $90-$100; good, large squares, $80, large rounds, $75-$85; fair, large rounds, $60-$70; utility, large squares, $55, small squares, $1.60-$2/bale, large rounds, $45-$55. Premium alfalfa grass mix, large rounds, $110-$120; good, large rounds, $95-$100; fair, large rounds, $70-$85; utility, large rounds, $50-$65. Millet, none. Straw, small squares, $4-$4.30/bale. Cornstalks, large rounds, $13-$26.
In Montana, hay prices sold mostly steady to weak. Demand for hay was light to moderate this week. This is the last report of 2017. The next update will be on Jan. 5, 2018.
Supreme alfalfa, small squares, $200-$250, large squares, $150-$155, export, $145; premium, large squares, $140-$155, export, $145, large rounds, $150; good, large squares, $110-$155, large rounds, $140-$160, small squares, $130-$140; fair, large squares, $110-$135, large rounds, $115-$145, small squares, $130; utility, large rounds, $100, large squares, NA. Premium grass alfalfa, small squares, NA; good, large rounds, NA, small squares, NA; fair, large squares, NA, large rounds, $100-$120; utility, large rounds, $90. Premium grass, large rounds, NA; good, large squares, NA, large rounds, NA; fair, large squares, NA, large rounds, $90-$115; utility, large rounds, NA. Premium timothy grass, small squares, $210-$240, large rounds, NA; good, large rounds, NA. Barley straw, large squares, $43-$50, long haul, $40, large rounds, NA, small squares, NA. Wheat straw, SCMT, large squares, $38-$40, long haul, $35. NMT, large squares, NA, large rounds, NA. Wheat hay, large rounds, $120. Cornstalk, large rounds, $45-$75.
In Wyoming, western Nebraska and western South Dakota, prices were mostly steady with demand light in all regions.
Eastern Wyoming—Supreme alfalfa, large squares, $200 delivered. No reported quotes for other classes of hay.
Central/western Wyoming—Supreme alfalfa, small squares, $200. No reported quotes for other classes of hay.
Western Nebraska—Good alfalfa, large squares, $135. Ground and delivered, $135. Good wheat straw, large squares, $65. No reported quotes for other classes of hay.
Western South Dakota—No reported quotes for other classes of hay.
In Colorado, prices were steady. Activity is light and demand good in all classes.
Northeast—Supreme alfalfa, large squares, $200 delivered; premium/supreme, small squares, $245-$255; fair/good, large squares, $130-$140, rounds, $130-$140. Premium alfalfa grass, rounds, $175. Premium orchard/brome grass, small squares, $335. No reported quotes for all other classes of hay.
Southeast—Good triticale, large squares, $120. Good sorghum sudan, rounds, $75. No reported quotes for other classes of hay.
San Luis Valley—Fair alfalfa, large squares, $110, rain damaged. No reported quotes for other classes.
Southwest—No reported quotes from all other classes of hay.
Mountains/northwest—No reported quotes for all other classes of hay.
In Missouri, overall hay movement is slow, supplies are moderate, demand is light and prices are steady.
Supreme alfalfa, RFV 185 $180-$250; premium, RFV 170-180, $150-$180; good, RFV 150-170 $120-$160, small squares $4.50-$5/bale; fair, RFV 130-150, $100-$120. Good mixed grass hay, $75-$100, small squares, $3-$4.50/bale, some alfalfa/grass mix. Fair/good mixed grass hay, $50-$80, small squares, $2.50-$3.50. Fair mixed grass hay, large rounds, $20-$35/bale. Good bromegrass, $100-$150; fair/good, $50-$80. Wheat straw, small squares, $3-$6/bale.
In Oklahoma, alfalfa trade moderate. Movement moderate to active. Demand for premium/good quality alfalfa moderate to good. Demand for better quality wheat and grass hay also moderate to good. Alfalfa prices fully steady to firm and grass hay prices steady.
Central—Supreme alfalfa, large squares, $150; premium, large squares, $125-$140, small squares, $10-$12.50/bale; good, large squares, $100-$120; fair/good, round bales, few large squares, $80-$100. Good bermuda grass hay, 4 x 5 bales, $25-$45/bale, 5 x 6 bales, $40-$60/bale. Mixed grass, 4 x 5, rounds, $20-$40/bale. Bermuda grass, small squares, $7.50-$9/bale.
Eastern—Premium alfalfa, large squares, $125-$135; good, large squares, $100-$120. Mixed grass hay, 5 x 6 bales, $30-$50. Good bermuda 5 x 6 bales, $50-$65/bale. Mixed grass, 4 x 5 bales, $25-$40/bale, small squares, good mixed grass or bermuda, $4-$6/bale.
Western—Premium alfalfa, large squares, few sales $130-$140; good, $100-$120. Grinding alfalfa, $60. Good wheat hay, 5 x 6 bales, mostly $45-$50/bale. Good bermuda horse quality, $65-$70/bale in 5 x 6 bales, good bermuda cow hay, 5 x 6 bales, $45-$60/bale; 4 x 5 bales mixed grass, $35-$45/bale, 5 x 6 bales wheat straw, $40-$45/bale.
In Texas, hay traded mostly steady to instances $10 higher due to freight and demand of top quality hay. Movement was moderate as supplemental feeding of livestock is in full swing across most of the state.
Panhandle/High Plains—Premium/supreme alfalfa, large squares, delivered, $190-$240, large rounds, 1200 lbs., delivered, $90/bale; good/premium, large squares, delivered, $150-$180, small bales delivered, $231-$288.75. Ground alfalfa, delivered to feedlots, $155-$165, calf, $165-$170, brown, $140. Good/premium coastal bermuda, large rounds, delivered $130-$180. Wheat hay, large bales, delivered, $130. Oat hay, large bales, delivered, $80, 1200 lb. rounds, $150. Bluestem, large bales, delivered, $95-$125. Orchard grass, large bales, delivered, $160. Corn stalks, large bales, delivered, $80-$85. Hay grazer, large bales, delivered, $95-$125.
Far west Texas/Trans Pecos—Premium/supreme alfalfa, small squares, delivered local or FOB, $250-$330, large squares, delivered, $190-$240, large squares, FOB, $170-$220; good/premium, large squares, delivered, $170-$190, large squares, FOB, $140-$170; fair/good, large squares, FOB, $135-$140.
North/central/east—Premium/supreme alfalfa, large squares, delivered, $235-$250; good/premium, large squares, delivered, $195-$235. Good/premium coastal bermuda, small squares, FOB, $231-$297, large rounds, FOB $100-$120; fair/good, small squares, FOB, $198, large rounds, FOB $80-$100.
South—Good/premium coastal bermuda, small squares, FOB, $231-$265, large rounds, FOB and delivered locally, $100-$140; fair/good, small squares, FOB, $165-$198. Grass mix, large rounds, FOB, $80.

Saturday, December 23, 2017

Weekly Utah Hay Market Report

Utah Hay prices prices mostly firm,with trading slow on all Quality's.  Majority of movement on previous contracts.  Lower  quality hay demand
is light with good supplies. Confirmed sales 2,100 tons.

Northern Area: Alfalfa: Supreme No I dairy: 120—140.00; Premium:
100.00—120.00; 
Good  Feeder:  80.00-95.00.  Fair: 60.00-80. 00; Low: No  Quote.
Premium retail horse sales 100.00—150.00.

Central Area: Alfalfa: Supreme # 1 Dairy 120.00—140.00; Premium
Dairy: 100.00—110.00; Good  Feeder: 80.00-90.00;   Fair: 60.00-
80.00; Low: scarce.  Oat Hay: No Quotes.  
Premium retail horse sales: 110.00—150.00.

Southern  Area:   Alfalfa:  Supreme  #1  Dairy:  120.00—150.00;
Premium 100.00—130.00;  Good Feeder: 80.00—93.00; Fair: 60.00—
80.00; Low: no quotes.

Uintah Basin:  Alfalfa: Supreme  Dairy: 100.00—130.00; Premium
Dairy: 90.00—100.00;  Good  Feeder: 75.00-90.00;  Fair: 50.00-
70.00; Low: scarce. Premium retail horse sales: 150.00-180.00.
Note:  Low  quality  hay can be weedy, or weather damaged or all.
Detailed Quotations Utah:(Bales — large and small in stack), last 
quoted sales are sales more than two weeks old.

Alfalfa Small and Large Square Bales last quoted sales
 Retail Horse (small lots) 150.00-180.00
 Supreme Dairy            130.00-150.00  last quote
 Premium Dairy             90.00-125.00  last quote
      Good                         75.00-85.00 
      Fair                        60.00-75.00
      Low                             n/q  

Weekly East River South Dakota Hay Market

All prices per ton, unless noted, FOB the stack.

   Compared to last week:  All classes of hay remain steady.  Demand
Demand moderate overall, good in areas where hay supplies are not
as plentiful.  The mild, open weather is helping to stretch hay
supplies as cows are out grazing the corn stalk fields.  The weather
forecast continues to show above normal temps until midweek next week,
when colder temps move in along with a couple chances of snow.  All hay
and straw sold by the ton FOB, unless otherwise noted. 

   Alfalfa:  Supreme: Small Squares, 6.50 per bale (220.00 per ton).
Premium:  Large Squares, 170.00; Small Squares, 6.00 per bale. 
Good:  Large Rounds, 150.00-160.00.  Fair:  Large Rounds, 125.00-135.00.
Utility:  Large Rounds, 80.00-110.00.

   Sun-cured Alfalfa pellets:  15 pct 175.00; 17 pct 180.00.  Alfalfa
Meal:  17 pct 185.00.

   Alfalfa/Grass Mix:  Premium: Large Squares, 150.00.  Good: Large
Large Rounds, 135.00.

   Grass:  Good to Premium:  Large Rounds, 135.00.  Good:  Large
Squares, 125.00-130.00.  Large Rounds, 120.00. Fair: Large Rounds,
110.00-125.00.

   Wheat Straw:  Large Squares, 100.00.

   Cornstalks:  Large Rounds, 45.00, 50.00 del short haul.

Friday, December 22, 2017

Washington-Oregon (Columbia Basin) Weekly Hay Report

***Note: This will be the last report for 2017. The next report will be 
issued Jan. 12, 2018.
 
Tons:  1700    Last Week:  3550    Last Year:  4800 

   Compared to last week, Fair/Supreme Alfalfa firm in a light pre-holiday 
test. Trade slow this week in pre-holiday trading. Demand remains good for 
all grades of Alfalfa. Timothy for export remains slow. Retail/Feedstore not 
tested this week.  All prices are dollars per ton and FOB the farm or ranch 
unless otherwise stated. Delivered prices include freight, commissions and 
other expenses. The NW hay expo will be held on Jan. 17-18th 2018 at the 
Three Rivers Convention Center in Kennewick, WA.

                   Tons      Price      Wtd Avg    Comments
  Alfalfa                                                  
    Mid Square                                             
      Supreme      1000  175.00-175.00  175.00     Del     
      Fair          250  165.00-165.00  165.00     Export  

  Wheat Straw                                              
    Mid Square                                             
      Good          450   58.00-58.00    58.00             

Idaho Weekly Hay Report

Tons:  3600    Last Week:  3900    Last Year:  4400   

***Note: This will be the last report for 2017. The next report will be 
issued Jan. 12, 2018.

   Compared to last week, Alfalfa steady. Trade slow this week but some 
interest was noted by stock cow operators due to fires last summer there is 
less available winter feed. Retail/Feedstore not tested. Prices are dollars 
per ton and FOB the farm or ranch unless otherwise stated. 
 
                    Tons      Price      Wtd Avg    Comments
  Alfalfa                                                     
    Mid Square                                                
      Premium       2100  165.00-170.00  165.24     Tarped    
      Fair          1000  100.00-105.00  102.50               

  Wheat Straw                                                 
    Mid Square                                                
      Good           500   55.00-55.00    55.00

Weekly Texas Hay Report

***Last Report of the year, report will resume January 5th, 2018.***

  Compared to last report: All hay classes traded fully steady on 
moderate movement.  The variety of hay and top quality hay was proving 
more difficult to find as it has been bought or contacted by this time of 
year.  The Panhandle remains extremely dry and in much need of moisture 
for winter wheat grazing pastures.  East Texas had received rain and 
paired with colder temperatures had supplemental feeding in full swing.  
Coastal Bermuda producers in those areas report plenty of hay available 
and most were able to get done with a fourth cutting.  Prices for hay and 
pellets quoted per ton except where noted.

   The Texas Department of Agriculture has Hay and Grazing Hot Line set 
up for Buyers and sellers looking for hay or grazing; the number is 1-
877-429-1998. The website for the hotline is: 
www.TexasAgriculture.gov/hayhotline

Panhandle/High Plains:
   Alfalfa: Large Squares: Delivered: Premium to Supreme 190.00-240.00; 
  Good to Premium 180.00-190.00.
  Large Rounds (1200 lbs): Delivered: Premium to Supreme 90.00 
  Per bale. 
  Small Bales: Delivered: Good to Premium 231.00-288.75, 7.00-
  8.75 per bale.       
   Ground Alfalfa: Delivered to feedlots: 155.00-165.00, Calf 165.00-
  170.00, Brown 140.00. 
   Coastal Bermuda: Large Rounds: Delivered: Good to Premium 130.00- 
  180.00, 65.00-90.00 per bale.
   Wheat Hay: Large Bales: Delivered: 130.00.
   Oat Hay: Large Bales: Delivered: 80.00. (1200 lb rounds) 150.00.
   Bluestem: Large Bales: Delivered: 95.00-125.00.
   Orchard Grass: Large Bales: Delivered: 160.00.
   Corn Stalks: Large Bales: Delivered: 80.00-85.00.
   Hay Grazer: Large Bales: Delivered: 95.00-125.00.
      
Far West Texas/Trans Pecos: 
   Alfalfa: Small Squares: Delivered local or FOB: Premium to Supreme
       250.00-330.00, 7.50-10.00 per bale.
   Large Squares: Delivered: Premium to Supreme 190.00-240.00; 
  Good to Premium 170.00-190.00.
  Large Squares: FOB: Premium to Supreme 170.00-220.00; Good to 
  Premium 140.00-170.00; Fair to Good 135.00-140.00.

North, Central, and East Texas:
   Alfalfa: Large Squares: Delivered: Premium to Supreme 235.00-250.00;    
  Good to Premium 195.00-235.00.                           
   Coastal Bermuda: Small Squares: FOB: Good to Premium 231.00-297.00, 
  7.00-9.00 per bale; Fair to Good 198.00, 6.00 
  per bale.
     Large Rounds: FOB: Good to Premium 100.00-120.00, 50.00-60.00 
  per roll; Fair to Good 80.00-100.00, 40.00-50.00 per roll.
       
South Texas:
   Coastal Bermuda: Small Squares: FOB: Good to Premium 231.00-265.00, 
  7.00-8.00 per bale; Fair to Good 165.00-198.00, 5.00-6.00 per 
  bale. 
   Large Rounds: FOB and delivered locally: Good to Premium 
  100.00-140.00, 50.00-70.00 per roll. 
  Grass Mix: Large Rounds: FOB: 80.00; 40.00 per roll.
   

Rock Valley Hay Auction

For Thursday, Dec 21, 2017

Receipts:  68 loads    Last Week:  80 loads    Last Year:  113 loads    

   Compared to last week: Alfalfa and grass sold steady.  Prices dollars per 
ton, except where noted.  All sales FOB Rock Valley, Iowa, vicinity.  

One load Small Squares equals approximately 5 tons; Large Squares and 
Large Rounds range from 10-25 tons per load.

   Alfalfa:  Good: Large Squares, 6 loads 115.00-130.00; Large Rounds, 8 loads 
115.00-130.00.  Fair:  Large Squares, 1 load 110.00; Small Squares, 1 load 
130.00; Large Rounds, 9 loads 100.00-110.00.  Utility: Small Squares, 1 load 
3.50 per bale; Large Rounds, 4 loads 65.00-87.50.

   Grass:  Good: Large Rounds, 13 loads 120.00-132.50.  Fair: Large Rounds, 5 
loads 102.50-115.00.  Utility: Large Rounds, 4 loads 85.00-97.50.

   Alfalfa/Grass Mix:  Fair: 3 loads 90.00-105.00.

   Oat Hay:  None.

   Rye Hay:  None.

   Millet Hay:  None.

   Straw:  None.

   Cornstalks:  None.

Oregon Weekly Hay Report

                                                   
                              
   Compared to Dec 15:  Prices trended generally steady in a limited test.  
Retail/Stable type hay remains the largest demanded hay.  Many hay producers 
have sold out for the year.  Buyers wanting to bump up their hay inventory
prior to the upcoming holidays has increased sales somewhat this week.                                                  

Tons:  2780    Last Week:  2935    Last Year:  1572                            

Crook, Deschutes, Jefferson, Wasco Counties:                                   
                             Tons   Price Range   Wtd Avg    Comments          
  Alfalfa                                                                      
    Large Square                                                               
      Good                    300  150.00-150.00  150.00                       
    Small Square                                                               
      Premium                   1  225.00-225.00  225.00                       
                                3  230.00-230.00  230.00     Retail/Stable     

  Orchard Grass                                                                
    Small Square                                                               
      Premium                   6  230.00-230.00  230.00     Retail/Stable     

  Bluegrass                                                                    
    Small Square                                                               
      Premium                  10  250.00-250.00  250.00     Retail/Stable     

Eastern Oregon:                                                                
                             Tons   Price Range   Wtd Avg    Comments          
  Alfalfa/Orchard/Fescue Mix                                                          
    Large Square                                                               
      Good/Premium            300  125.00-125.00  125.00                       

Klamath Basin:                                                                 
                             Tons   Price Range   Wtd Avg    Comments          
  Alfalfa                                                                      
    Large Square                                                               
      Supreme                 200  225.00-225.00  225.00                       
      Good                     45  125.00-125.00  125.00     Rain Damage       

  Orchard Grass                                                                
    Small Square                                                               
      Premium                  75  220.00-220.00  220.00     Retail/Stable     

Lake County:                                                                   
                             Tons   Price Range   Wtd Avg    Comments          
  Alfalfa                                                                      
    Large Square                                                               
      Supreme                 100  215.00-215.00  215.00                       
      Premium                1000  180.00-180.00  180.00                       
                              500  170.00-170.00  170.00     Export            
    Small Square                                                               
      Premium                  80  185.00-185.00  185.00     Retail/Stable     

  Alfalfa/Oat Mix                                                              
    Small Square                                                               
      Good/Premium             50  125.00-125.00  125.00     Retail/Stable     

  Orchard Grass                                                                
    Small Square                                                               
      Premium                  10  185.00-185.00  185.00     Retail/Stable     

  Triticale                                                                    
    Large Square                                                               
      Good                    100  100.00-100.00  100.00                       

Harney County: No New Sales Confirmed.                           

California Hay Report

  Compared to last week: All classes traded steady with moderate demand.  Retail 
hay is in high demand due to lack of hay in barns this year.  Still some last 
minute cuttings going on in region 6.  All hay is reported FOB the stack or barn 
unless otherwise noted. Regions are defined at bottom of report. 

Tons:  6480    Last Week:  5850    Last Year:  2350                            

Region 1: North Inter-Mountain:                                                
                             Tons   Price Range   Wtd Avg    Comments          
  Alfalfa                                                                      
      Premium                 100  225.00-230.00  227.50     Retail/Stable     
      Good                     50  230.00-230.00  230.00                       
      Fair                    120  165.00-165.00  165.00                       
  Forage Mix-Three Way                                                         
      Good                     25  150.00-150.00  150.00     Organic           

Region 2: Sacramento Valley:                                                   
                             Tons   Price Range   Wtd Avg    Comments          
  Alfalfa                                                                      
      Supreme                 520  305.00-305.00  305.00 Del                   
      Premium                  75  280.00-280.00  280.00     Retail/Stable     

Region 3: Northern San Joaquin Valley:                                         
                             Tons   Price Range   Wtd Avg    Comments          
  Alfalfa                                                                      
      Premium                 200  240.00-255.00  247.50 Del Retail/Stable     
      Fair                    300  200.00-200.00  200.00 Del                   
  Rye Grass                                                                    
      Good                   1000   90.00-90.00    90.00                       
  Forage Mix-Three Way                                                         
      Good                    200  145.00-145.00  145.00 Del                   

Region 4: Central San Joaquin Valley:                                          
                             Tons   Price Range   Wtd Avg    Comments          
  Alfalfa                                                                      
      Premium/Supreme         300  300.00-300.00  300.00 Del                   
      Premium                 500  285.00-310.00  297.50 Del                   
                              520  325.00-325.00  325.00 Del Organic           
      Good                    300  255.00-260.00  257.50 Del                   
      Fair                    500  210.00-210.00  210.00 Del                   

  Oat                                                                          
      Good                     25  245.00-245.00  245.00 Del Retail/Stable     

Region 5: Southern California:                                                 
                             Tons   Price Range   Wtd Avg    Comments          
  Forage Mix-Four Way                                                          
      Good                     25  280.00-280.00  280.00     Retail/Stable     

Region 6: Southeast California:                                                
                             Tons   Price Range   Wtd Avg    Comments          
  Alfalfa                                                                      
      Premium                 125  200.00-200.00  200.00                       
                              875  200.00-205.00  202.14     Retail/Stable     
      Good/Premium            520  170.00-180.00  172.31                       
  Bermuda Grass                                                                
      Premium                 200  165.00-165.00  165.00     Export            

The following are the counties included in each region:                        
Region 1: Siskiyou, Modoc, Shasta, Lassen, and Plumas.                         
Region 2: Tehama, Glenn, Butte, Colusa, Sutter, Yuba, Sierra, Nevada, Placer,  
          Yolo, El Dorado, Solano, Sacramento, Amador, and Alpine.             
Region 3: San Joaquin, Calaveras, Stanislaus, Tuolumne, Mono, Merced, Mariposa.
Region 4: Madera, Fresno, Kings, Tulare, and Inyo.                             
Region 5: Kern, Northeast Los Angeles, and Western San Bernardino.             
Region 6: Eastern San Bernardino, Riverside, and Imperial.       

Iowa Hay Summary

Week Ending  Friday December 22, 2017

For this week: Hay prices were mostly steady to spot instances lower. 
Demand was mostly moderate to instances light given the approach of the
holiday week. Looking forward temperatures drop to normal December temps 
with highs in the teens and lows in the single digits.

According to the Drought Monitor D1-D4 drought conditions increased 
slightly from 7.39% to 8.3% this week. D0-D4 drought conditions, which 
includes (Abnormally Dry as D0), increased significantly from 53.09% to 
71.04% this week. The abnormally dry conditions spread north and south in 
central Iowa and in the eastern portion of the state. Moderate drought 
extended farther in south central and eastern Iowa.

Alfalfa         Supreme Small Squares      $250.00  -  $310.00
                        Large Squares      $200.00  -  $220.00

                Premium Large Round        $170.00  -  $175.00

Alfalfa/Grass   Premium Small Squares      $190.00  -  $240.00
                        Large Squares      $175.00  -  $190.00
                        Large Rounds       $165.00  -  $195.00

                Good    Large Squares      $135.00  -  $170.00
                        Large Rounds       $125.00  -  $145.00

                Fair    Small Squares      $115.00  -  $145.00
                        Large Squares      $115.00  -  $130.00
                        Large Rounds       $ 80.00  -  $100.00

                Utility Small Squares      $ 75.00  -  $95.00
                        Large Rounds       $ 50.00  -  $75.00

Grass           Good    Large Squares      $135.00  -  $180.00
                        Large Rounds       $120.00  -  $150.00

                Fair    Large Rounds       $100.00  -  $100.00

Straw           Wheat   Small Squares      $140.00  -  $205.00
                        Large Squares      $115.00  -  $115.00

Certified Organic Hay: None reported for the week of 12/17-23/2017

Thursday, December 21, 2017

Ordering corn hybrids for silage

A farmer has hundreds of corn hybrids from which to choose, and those are just the ones within the relative maturity (RM) range appropriate for where he or she farms. An acceptable range in maturity is usually about 10 days of RM – for instance, a range of 100 to 110 days RM.
In this case, you’d expect a 100-RM hybrid that’s planted timely to mature every year, while a 110-RM hybrid would mature almost every year but would provide a bit more yield potential during a year with more heat units than normal.
We’re starting with the impact of weather because this has more influence than any other single factor on the yield and quality of corn silage. The other “biggie” is harvest timing, but when the crop is ready for harvest is also related to environmental conditions, since the weather influences when you can plant and crop development.

Getting started

I think you should buy corn hybrids for silage only from seed companies that evaluate their hybrids for silage use. This doesn’t necessarily mean they sell silage-only corn hybrids, but they should have silage yield and quality data, including fiber digestibility. In some seed company catalogs, corn silage is mentioned only in passing – or not at all.
This isn’t surprising, since typically only 6 to 7 percent of U.S. corn acreage is harvested for silage, but how much does a grain-oriented seed company know about the performance of their hybrids when harvested for whole-plant silage?
It might actually have one or more hybrids well suited for silage, but if the company isn’t willing to evaluate its hybrids for silage, including both yield and quality, you should look elsewhere for your seed.

Silage-only hybrids

Some silage-only hybrids are higher in neutral detergent fiber digestibility (NDFd) than just about any dual-purpose hybrid (intended for harvest as silage or grain), but many dual-purpose hybrids are higher in NDFd than some silage-only hybrids. Got that?
And just because a silage-only hybrid is higher in NDFd doesn’t guarantee it’s a better hybrid than a dual-purpose one. There’s also yield, starch content, disease and drought resistance, standability, etc. There’s simply no one hybrid type that fits all situations.
The two major types of silage-only hybrids are BMR and leafy gene. Almost all BMR seed corn is sold by two large multinational companies, while leafy hybrids are sold by a number of companies.
University trials comparing BMR hybrids are few and far between, but both companies have BMR hybrids reliably higher in NDFd than conventional hybrids but (usually) slightly lower in yield.
There are many situations where a farmer would be willing to sacrifice some yield for increased NDFd, but this depends on the herd’s milk production level, rate of corn silage feeding, willingness to pay a premium price for BMR seed, and how upset they’d be if their BMR corn didn’t look as pretty as their neighbor’s conventional corn.
BMR corn may not be impressive-looking in the field, but BMR silage puts milk in the tank and, as mother used to say, “Pretty is as pretty does.”
Leafy gene hybrids are almost the opposite of BMR corn. “Leafies” have up to 50 percent more leaves above the ear than do conventional hybrids and, because of this, they look great in the field. Most leafy hybrids are priced similar to conventional hybrids.
In spite of their good looks, university trials have found leafy hybrids don’t have a consistent advantage in yield or forage quality. Some leafy hybrids are top-notch performers, combining high yield and good forage quality – while others are just so-so. Therefore, farmers should buy leafy hybrids based on proven performance, not just because they have the leafy gene.
Back in the 1990s through the “aughts” when I managed Miner Institute’s crop operation (Chazy, New York), we planted a fair amount of leafy corn, but that was because a couple of leafies were at or near the top of Cornell University’s silage hybrid trials.

Traits

Farmers now have the choice of no fewer than six genetic traits: tolerance to the herbicides glyphosate (Roundup), glufosinate (Liberty) and 2,4-D plus drought tolerance and resistance to corn rootworms and European corn borers. Several traits can be “stacked” in a hybrid, and it’s important to choose the traits needed for each field situation. Don’t pay for traits you don’t need.
For instance, if you won’t apply glyphosate to your corn, then you don’t need hybrids with the Roundup Ready trait. And there’s no need for a rootworm resistance trait in first-year corn coming out of forage production. It’s now more important than ever for farmers to keep excellent records so they know what hybrid with which traits is planted where.
Many of us have heard of the farmer who had his corn sprayed with glyphosate thinking it was a Roundup Ready hybrid. Then all the corn started to die … oops.
Disease resistance isn’t a genetically modified trait, but it’s something you should be able to find listed with hybrid descriptions in the seed catalog. If not, ask your seed dealer to get this information, since it may be available even if it’s not in the catalog.
Most seed companies rate their hybrids for resistance to northern corn leaf blight and gray leaf spot, but some seed companies include hybrid ratings for several other corn diseases. When a disease such as northern corn leaf blight is present in a field, the difference between a hybrid with a high rating for northern corn leaf blight resistance versus one with a low rating can be tremendous – literally a matter of life and death for the corn plant.
And there usually isn’t any price premium for a hybrid with high resistance to a particular disease.

Finally …

There’s not nearly as much yield and quality data available from land-grant university silage trials as there was even five years ago. Part of this is from cutbacks at the universities, but some seed companies have stopped entering hybrids in university trials, so farmers have to look for other sources of information.
These may include crop management association trials and recommendations, seed company trials, and the advice and experience of seed dealers and your neighbors.
How a particular hybrid does in a university trial three states away is interesting; how it does in your county or on your farm in a side-by-side trial with other hybrids is much more useful.  

  • Everett D. Thomas

  • Oak Point Agronomics Ltd.

Nebraska Hay Summary

Week Ending December 22, 2017

  Compared to last week alfalfa and grass hay sold unevenly steady. 
Ground and delivered hay and dehy alfalfa pellets sold steady. Demand was 
moderate to good for most offerings of baled and ground and delivered 
hay. Some users of ground products are stocking up this week due to the 
Christmas holiday. Some producers continue to make cornstalk bales 
between very light dustings of snow and light rain. Some ranchers 
continue to purchase alfalfa and grass hay for winter feeding needs. 
Quite a lot of dehy pellets continue to move across the state and into 
large feed mills for regrinding into other livestock feeds.   All sales 
are dollars per ton FOB the field or hay barn, unless otherwise noted. 
Wishing everyone a very Merry Christmas! 

Eastern/Central parts Nebraska
Alfalfa: Supreme large square bales 160.00-180.00, Premium large square 
bales 155.00-175.00, Good large square bales 120.00-135.00. Good to 
Premium large round bales 100.00-110.00. Good large round 75.00-85.00.  
Grass Hay: Good to Premium large square bales 90.00.  Good to Premium 
large round bales 80.00-90.00; fair large rounds 60.00-70.00. Premium 
small square bales of prairie hay 150.00. Cornstalk bales 50.00-55.00. 
Ground and delivered alfalfa 115.00.  Dehy Alfalfa pellets 17 percent 
protein 195.00-230.00. Sun-cured alfalfa pellets 15 percent protein 
190.00, 17 percent protein 195.00. 

Platte Valley area of Nebraska
Alfalfa: Fair to Good large square bales 155.00. Good large round bales 
85.00-90.00; fair large round bales 60.00. Grass Hay: Large round bales 
90.00-100.00; fair large round bales 55.00-60.00. Cane Hay large round 
bales 65.00-70.00. Cornstalk bales 50.00-55.00. Ground and delivered 
alfalfa 120.00-130.00. Alfalfa/Stover mix 115.00, Ground and delivered 
cornstalks 85.00-100.00. Dehy pellets 17 percent protein 190.00-200.00. 

Western and Panhandle area of Nebraska
Alfalfa: Premium large square bales 160.00-180.00; Good large square 
bales 120.00-140.00. Alfalfa/Orchard grass: Good to Premium large square 
bales 140.00-150.00. Orchard Grass: Premium large square bales 145.00.  
Ground and delivered alfalfa 130.00-135.00. 

Oklahoma Hay Market Report

THIS IS THE FINAL OKLAHOMA HAY REPORT FOR 2017. NEXT REPORT JANUARY 4, 2018.

Alfalfa trade active early this week but turned slow to moderate late. 
Movement was moderate but turned slow late prior to the holiday weekend.  
Demand was good for all types of alfalfa and wheat hay. Demand for most grass 
hay light to moderate. Prices on confirmed sales were fully steady. Most 
forecasts are calling for continued dry weather and sharply lower 
temperatures over the next week. 

Market News continues to maintain an online hay directory for both in-state
and out-of-state hay producers.  The directories are on the ODAFF homepage
at www.oda.state.ok.us. Producers wishing to list hay are encouraged to call
at 1-800-580-6543 or email jack.carson@ag.ok.gov. 
 
Alfalfa
 
Central Oklahoma: Supreme quality large square bales 150.00. Premium quality 
large square bales 125.00-140.00, mostly 130.00. Good quality large square 
bales mostly 100.00-120.00. Fair to Good quality round bales and few large 
square bales 80.00-100.00. Small square bales Premium Quality 10.00-12.50 per 
bale.

Eastern Oklahoma: Premium quality large square bales 125.00-135.00. Good 
quality large square alfalfa 100.00-120.00.

Western Oklahoma: Premium quality large square bales 130.00-140.00. Good 
quality 100.00-120.00, few round bales 90.00-100.00.

Grass Hay
Central Oklahoma: Good Bermuda 4 X 5 bales 25.00-45.00 per bale, 5 X 6 bales 
40.00-60.00 per bale, mostly 40.00-50.00. Mixed grass 4 X 5 round bales 
20.00-40.00 per bale. Bermuda grass small square bales 7.50-9.00 per bale.

Western Oklahoma: Good quality wheat hay 5 X 6 bales 45.00-50.00/bale. Good 
Bermuda horse quality 65.00-70.00 per bale in 5 X 6 bales, Good Bermuda cow 
hay 5 X 6 bales 45.00-60.00 per bale, 4 X 5 bales mixed grass 35.00-45.00 per 
bale. 5 X 6 bales wheat straw 40.00-45.00 per bale.

Eastern Oklahoma:  Mixed grass hay in 5 X 6 bales 30.00-50.00. Good Bermuda 
in 5 X 6 bales 50.00-65.00 per bale. Mixed grass 4 x 5 bales 25.00-40.00 per 
bale. Small square bales good mixed grass or Bermuda 4.00-6.00 per bale.

Prices are dollars per ton and FOB unless otherwise noted.

Missouri Weekly Hay Summary

Week ending 12/22/2017

   
The entire state in now officially listed in some state of drought status, 
as the northwest was as abnormally dry.  The official start of winter also 
arrived this week and although temperatures have been above normal forecast 
are projecting that more winter like temperatures at least are on the way. 
There has been an uptick in interest for hay this week but nearly all seems 
to be from horse owners looking for small amounts of better quality hay.  
Many cattle man are feeding now but trying to feed older lower quality hay 
have had setting around for a year or two until tempatures require better 
quality feed. Overall hay movement is slow, supplies are moderate, demand 
is light and prices are steady. The Missouri Department of Agriculture has 
a hay directory available for both buyers and sellers. To be listed, or for 
a directory visit http://mda.mo.gov/abd/haydirectory/ for listings of hay 
http://agebb.missouri.edu/haylst/ (All prices f.o.b. and per ton unless 
specified and on most recent reported sales price listed as round bales 
based generally on 5x6 bales with weights of approximately 1200-1500 lbs).

Supreme quality Alfalfa (RFV <185) 180.00-250.00
Premium quality Alfalfa (RFV 170-180) 150.00-180.00
Good quality Alfalfa (RFV 150-170) 120.00-160.00 
small squares 4.50-5.00 per bale
Fair quality Alfalfa (RFV 130-150) 100.00-120.00 
 
Good quality Mixed Grass hay 75.00-100.00
Small squares 3.00-4.50 per bale (some alfalfa/grass mix)
Fair to Good quality Mixed Grass hay 50.00-80.00
small squares 2.50-3.50 per bale
Fair quality Mixed Grass hay 20.00-35.00 per large round bale 

Good quality Bromegrass 100.00-150.00
Fair to Good quality Bromegrass 50.00-80.00

Wheat straw 3.00-6.00 per small square bale

Colorado Hay Report

   Compared to last week, prices were steady.  Activity light and demand good in 
all classes.  The USDA NRCS National Water and Climate Center’s Colorado SNOTEL 
Snow/Precipitation Update Report for Thursday, December 21, 2017 has the 
Gunnison River Basin Snow Water Equivalent at 37%, the Upper Colorado River 
basin at 58%, the South Platte River Basin at 70%, the Laramie and North Platte 
River Basins at 73%, the Yampa and White River Basins at 58%, the Arkansas River 
Basin at 46%, the Upper Rio Grande Basin at 31% and the San Miguel, Dolores, 
Animas and San Juan River Basins at 21% as a percent of the median of all SNOTEL 
sites in each basin compared to previous years.  The next available report will 
be Thursday, January 11, 2018.  All prices reported are FOB at the stack or barn 
unless otherwise noted.  Prices reflect load lots of hay.  If you have hay for 
sale or need hay, use the services of the Colorado Department of Agriculture 
website: www.coloradoagriculture.com.

Northeast Colorado Areas
  Orchard/Brome Grass
   Small Squares: Premium 315.00 (9.50 per bale); Good 305.00 (8.75 per bale).
  Sorghum Sedan
   Large Squares: Good 70.00 DEL.
   No reported quotes for all other classes of hay.

Southeast Colorado Areas
  Grass
   Rounds: Good 170.00.
  Sorghum Sudan
   Round Bales: Good 75.00.
   No reported quotes for all other classes of hay.

San Luis Valley Area
  Alfalfa
   Large Squares: Utility 105.00.
   No reported quotes for all other classes of hay.

Southwest Colorado Areas
  Orchard Grass
   Small Squares: Premium 290.00 (13.00 per bale).
   No reported quotes from all other classes of hay.

Mountains and Northwest Colorado Areas
  Grass
   Mid Squares: Good 150.00.
   Small Squares: Good 200.00 (6.00 per bale).
   No reported quotes for all other classes of hay.

Northeast: Weld, Washington, Morgan, Cheyenne, Kiowa, Lincoln, Elbert, 
Adams, Sedgwick, Yuma, Larimer, Jefferson, Douglas, Kit Carson, Phillips, 
Logan, Boulder, Arapahoe, and El Paso.
Southeast: Fremont, Custer, Huerfano, Las Animas, Bent, Otero, Prowers, 
Crowley, and Pueblo.
San Luis Valley: Saguache, Alamosa, Costilla, Conejos, Rio Grande, and 
Mineral.
Southwest: Mesa, Delta, Montrose, Ouray, San Miguel, Montezuma, Dolores, 
San Juan, Hinsdale, Archuleta, and La Plata.
Mountains and Northwest: Moffat, Routt, Jackson, Rio Blanco, Garfield, 
Gunnison, Teller, Grand, Chaffee, Park, Clear Creek, Gilpin, Summit, 
Lake, and Eagle.

Wyoming, Western Nebraska, and Western South Dakota Hay Report

***Due to the holidays, this report will not be released next week. The next 
available report will be Thursday, January 4, 2018. ***

   Compared to last week, prices were mostly steady with demand light in all 
regions.  The USDA Wyoming NRCS Snow-Precipitation Update for December 20, 2017 
has the Snake River Basin Snow Water Equivalent at 119%, the Madison-Gallatin 
basin at 102%, the Yellowstone Basin at 152%, the Wind River Basin at 144%, the 
Bighorn Basin at 130%, the Shoshone River Basin at 156%, the Powder River Basin 
at 122%, the Tongue River Basin at 90%, the Belle Fourche Basin at 170%, the 
Cheyenne River Basin at 117%, the Upper North Platte Basin at 73%, the 
Sweetwater Basin at 96%, the Lower North Platte Basin at 72%, the Laramie River 
Basin at 99%, the South Platte Basin at 130%, the Little Snake River Basin at 
61%, the Upper Green River Basin at 114%, the Lower Green River Basin at 78%, 
and the Upper Bear River Basin at 70% as a percent of the median of all SNOTEL 
sites in each basin.  According to the United States Drought Monitor, warmth was 
notable in eastern Montana and the Dakotas where temperatures were up to 20°F 
above normal. Abnormally dry conditions continued to expand across western 
Nebraska, reaching into southeastern Wyoming.  All prices dollars per ton FOB 
stack in large square bales and rounds, unless otherwise noted. Most horse hay 
sold in small squares. Prices are from the most recent reported sales. 

Eastern Wyoming 
  Alfalfa
   No reported quotes for other classes of hay.

Central and Western Wyoming
  Alfalfa
   Small Squares: Supreme 200.00 (6.50 per bale).
   No reported quotes for other classes of hay. 

Western Nebraska
  Alfalfa
   Large Squares: Good 135.00.
   Ground and Delivered: 135.00.
   Round Bales: Good/Fair 145.00; Fair 135.00.
  Forage Barley
   Round Bales: Good 125.00.
  Wheat Straw
   Large Squares: Good 65.00.
   No reported quotes for other classes of hay.

Western South Dakota
   No reported quotes for other classes of hay.

Tuesday, December 19, 2017

Corsica, SD Hay and Straw Auction

For Monday Dec 18, 2017

Receipts:  44 Loads    Last Week:  42 Loads    Last Year:  13 Loads

All prices dollars per ton FOB Corsica, SD.

One load Small Squares equals approximately 5 tons; Large Squares and
Large Rounds range from 10-25 tons per load.

***This is the last Monday sale for the 2017 season.  The next available report 
will be on Tuesday, January 9, 2018.***

   Alfalfa:  Good: Large Rounds, 12 loads 107.50-117.50; Fair: Large Rounds, 8 
loads 90.00-105.00.

   Grass:  Good: Large Rounds, 11 loads 105.00-120.00.  Fair: Large Rounds, 7 
loads 67.50-102.50.

   Straw: Large Rounds, 1 load 67.50.

   Corn Stalks: Large Rounds, 5 loads 45.00-50.00.

Rock Valley Hay Auction

For Monday, Dec 18, 2017

Receipts:  35 loads    Last Week:  39 loads    Year Ago:  37 loads
 
   Compared to last week:  Market was steady on comparable quality.  Prices 
dollars per ton, except where noted.  All sales FOB Rock Valley, Iowa, vicinity.  

One load Small Squares equals approximately 5 tons; Large Squares and 
Large Rounds range from 10-25 tons per load.

***This is the last Monday sale for the 2017 season.  The next available report 
will be on Tuesday, January 9, 2018.***

   Alfalfa:  Good: Large Squares, 2 loads 125.00-140.00; Large Rounds, 8 loads 
125.00-132.50.  Utility: Large Rounds, 1 load 60.00.

   Grass:  Good: Large Rounds, 5 loads 120.00-137.50.  Fair: Large Squares, 1 
load 107.50; Large Rounds, 5 loads 112.50-117.50.  Utility: Large Squares, 2 
loads 80.00-90.00; Large Rounds, 5 loads 85.00-97.50.

   Alfalfa/Grass: Good: Large Squares, 1 load 112.50.  Fair: Large Rounds, 1 
load 92.50.

   Millet:  None.

   Rye: None.

   Oat Hay:  None.

   Straw:  Small Squares, 1 load 4.75 per bale.

   Corn Stalks:  Large Rounds, 3 loads 40.00-47.50.

Kansas Hay Market Report

   
DUE TO THE HOLIDAYS, THIS WILL BE THE FINAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR.  THE NEXT 
REPORT WILL BE ISSUED ON JANUARY 9TH 2018.

                               *****MERRY CHRISTMAS*****

Ground alfalfa movement:  Southwest/South Central 
Tonnage: 9,085/4,454      Last week: 8,877/3,886     Lastyear: 11,240/3,513
             
Hay market activity slow to moderate; demand moderate to good for alfalfa and 
moderate for grass hay. Offerings of grinder hay light and continually difficult 
to locate, with prices trending higher for alfalfa and firm for grass hay.  
According to the U.S. Drought Monitor, Abnormally dry conditions (D0) have 
expanded into western Kansas, and northeastward into Nebraska. Areas of moderate 
drought (D1) deteriorated to severe drought (D2) in south central Kansas, 
adjoining the already severe drought condition in north central Oklahoma. 
Abnormally dry conditions were expanded across the remainder of southeastern 
Kansas. Moisture there is less than half of average. Soil moisture levels are 
down and surface water supplies, including stock ponds, are shrinking. The 
abnormally dry (D0) category increased to 99.11 pct, moderate drought (D1) 
increased to 20.58 pct and severe drought (D2) is 1.85.  If you have hay for 
sale, and/or need hay here in Kansas, use the services of the Internet Hay 
Exchange: www.hayexchange.com/ks.php.
  
Southwest Kansas  
Dairy alfalfa, grass hay, grinding alfalfa and ground/delivered steady; movement 
slow. Alfalfa: horse, small squares 240.00-250.00. Dairy, .85-.95/point RFV, 
Supreme 155.00-175.00, Premium 155.00-165.00, Good 135.00-155.00.  Stock or Dry 
Cow alfalfa, 110.00-120.00.  Fair/Good grinding alfalfa, 120.00-130.00. Ground 
and delivered locally to feedlots and dairies, 140.00-150.00. Grass hay: 
Bluestem large squares 80.00-90.00. Brome, none reported.  The week of 12/10-
12/16, 9,085T of grinding alfalfa and 750T of dairy alfalfa were delivered. 
Cornstalks: large round 55.00-65.00. 

South Central Kansas 
Dairy alfalfa, grass hay, grinding alfalfa, ground/delivered steady, alfalfa 
pellets steady to 5.00 higher; movement slow. Alfalfa: horse, small squares 
240.00-245.00. Dairy, .85-.90/point RFV. Supreme 155.00-165.00, Premium 150.00-
160.00, Good 130.00-150.00. Stock cow alfalfa, 130.00-135.00 delivered. 
Fair/Good grinding alfalfa, 100.00-110.00 with instances at 120.00-125.00.  
Ground and delivered locally to feedlots 130.00-140.00. The week of 12/10-12/16, 
4,454T of grinding alfalfa and 622.5T of dairy alfalfa were delivered. Alfalfa 
pellets: Sun Cured 15 pct protein 170.00-175.00, 17 pct protein 180.00-185.00, 
Dehydrated 17 pct 207.00-217.00. Grass hay: bluestem, large rounds 65.00-70.00; 
Brome: large rounds 70.00-75.00, small squares 105.00-115.00. Sudan large rounds 
80.00-90.00. Teff, small squares 6.25-6.75 per bale, large squares 115.00-125.00 
delivered, large rounds 65.00-75.00.  Cornstalks: large rounds 55.00-60.00, 
cornstalks ground and delivered 60.00-70.00, Straw large squares 50.00-60.00, 
large rounds 50.00-55.00. Milo stalks 50.00-55.00. 

Southeast Kansas 
Dairy alfalfa, grass hay, grinding alfalfa and ground/delivered steady; movement 
slow.  Alfalfa: horse or goat, 210.00-220.00.  Dairy .80-.90/point RFV. Stock 
cow alfalfa 100.00-110.00 with an instance at 125.00-135.00.  Fair/Good grinding 
alfalfa 90.00-100.00. Ground and delivered, 105.00-115.00. Grass hay: bluestem, 
premium small squares 105.00-120.00. Good, mid and large squares 80.00-100.00, 
large rounds 60.00-70.00. Brome: small squares 6.00-8.00/bale. Good, mid and 
large squares 100.00-120.00, large rounds 75.00-85.00. Oat hay, large squares 
120.00-130.00. Straw, mid squares 50.00-60.00.

Northwest Kansas  
Dairy alfalfa, grinding alfalfa and ground/delivered steady; movement slow. 
Alfalfa: small squares, 5.00-6.00/bale. Goat, 170.00-180.00. Dairy, 
Premium/Supreme .80-.95/point RFV. Stock cow, fair/good 90.00-100.00. Fair/good 
grinding alfalfa, 85.00-95.00. Ground and delivered locally to feedlots and 
dairies, 100.00-105.00. 

North Central-Northeast Kansas 
Dairy alfalfa, grinding alfalfa steady, grass hay, ground/delivered steady,      
movement slow.  Alfalfa: horse, small squares 9.00-10.00/bale. Dairy .95-
1.05/point RFV, Supreme 175.00-195.00, Premium 170.00-185.00, Good 150.00-
170.00.  Stock Cow, good 110.00-120.00. Fair/Good, grinding alfalfa, 100.00-
110.00 with an instance at 120.00. Ground and delivered, 125.00-140.00 Grass 
hay: bluestem, small squares 5.00-6.00/bale, large squares 95.00-105.00, large 
rounds 65.00-75.00.  Brome: Good, small squares 6.00-7.00/bale delivered, mid 
and large squares, 105.00-115.00, good large rounds 75.00-80.00. Sudan large 
rounds 70.00-75.00; Milo Stalks: large rounds 40.00-55.00; Straw: small squares, 
4.00-5.00/bale, large squares 75.00-85.00, large rounds 65.00-75.00. Certified 
weed-free grass mulch small squares 4.00-5.00/bale, large rounds 45.00/bale.

Monday, December 18, 2017

Hay prices mixed across trading area

In Nebraska and the East River area of South Dakota, alfalfa and grass hay sold steady. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets sold steady. Ground and delivered forages sold steady. Demand is good for all forages as dry weather continues and many buyers are procuring some additional feed resources, according to the USDA Market News Service, Dec. 8. Prices given on per-ton basis, unless otherwise noted.
Eastern/central—Supreme alfalfa, large squares, $225; premium, small squares, $6-$6.50/bale; good/premium, large squares, $150-$180; good, large rounds, $85-$90. Good/premium alfalfa orchard grass, $100. Premium grass hay, large rounds, $85-$90; good, large rounds, $80-$85; fair, large rounds, $60-$70. Premium prairie hay, small squares, $150. Cornstalk bales, $50-$55. Soybean stubble, rounds, $45. Ground and delivered alfalfa, $115. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17% protein, $195-$220. Sun-cured alfalfa pellets, 15% protein, $190, 17% protein, $195.
Platte Valley—Good alfalfa, large rounds $85-$90. Grass hay, large rounds, $90-$100; fair, large rounds, $55-$60. Cane hay, large rounds, $65-$70. Oat hay, large rounds, $85. Cornstalk bales. $50-$60. Bean stubble bales, $55. Ground and delivered alfalfa, $120-$130. Alfalfa stover mix, $115. Ground and delivered cornstalks, $85-$100. Dehydrated pellets, 17% protein, $185-$200. Sun-cured alfalfa pellets, $170.
Panhandle—Premium alfalfa, large squares, $160-$180; good, large squares, $120-$140. Good/premium alfalfa orchard grass, large squares, $140-$150. Premium orchard grass, large squares, $145. Grass hay, large rounds, $125 delivered. Ground and delivered alfalfa, $130-$135.
East River area of South Dakota—Supreme alfalfa, small squares, $6.50/bale; premium, large squares, $170, small squares, $6/bale; good, large rounds, $150-$160; fair, large rounds, $125-$135; utility, large rounds, $95-$100. Sun-cured alfalfa pellets, 15% protein, $170, 17% protein $175. Alfalfa meal, 17% protein, $180. Premium alfalfa grass mix, large squares, $150; good, large rounds, $135. Good/premium grass, large rounds, $135; good, large squares, $125-$130, large rounds, $120; fair, large rounds, $110-$125. Wheat straw, large squares, very clean $110. Cornstalks, large rounds, $45.
In Iowa, all class of hay sold firmer.
Rock Valley—Premium, large squares, $145-$155, large rounds, $150; good, large squares, $120-$130, small squares, $125, large rounds, $125-$135; fair, large rounds, $115-$122.50. Premium grass, large rounds, $127.50-$140; good, small squares, $125, large rounds, $110-$125; fair, small squares, $105, large rounds, $95-$105; utility, large rounds, $80-$92.50. Premium alfalfa grass mix, 1 load, $167.50. Oat hay, none. Rye hay, none. Millet hay, none. Straw, large squares, $110, small squares, $4.50/bale. Cornstalks, large rounds, $30-$47.50.
In Minnesota, prices were generally steady.
Good alfalfa, large rounds, $70; utility, large rounds, $45-$50. Premium grass, large squares, $95, large rounds, $95-$105; good, small squares, $2.90/bale, large rounds, $80-$909; fair, large rounds, $65-$75; utility, large rounds, $50. Good alfalfa grass mix, large squares, $90-$95; utility, large rounds, $75-$80. Millet, none. Oat straw, none. Cornstalks, large rounds, $20-$24.
In Montana, hay prices sold mostly $10 lower. Demand for hay was light to moderate this week with the best demand seen for large rounds.
Supreme alfalfa, small squares, $200-$250, large squares, $150-$155; premium, large squares, $140-$155, large rounds, $150; good, large squares, $110-$155, large rounds, $140-$160, small squares, $140-$150; fair, large squares, $110-$150, large rounds, $115-$145, small squares, $130; utility, large rounds, NA, large squares, $110-$120. Premium grass alfalfa, small squares, NA; good, large rounds, NA, small squares, NA; fair, large squares, NA, large rounds, $100-$120; utility, large rounds, $90. Premium grass, large rounds, NA; good, large squares, NA, large rounds, NA; fair, large squares, NA, large rounds, $90-$115; utility, large rounds, NA. Premium timothy grass, small squares, $210-$240, large rounds, NA; good, large rounds, NA. Barley straw, large squares, $43-$50, long haul, $40, large rounds, NA, small squares, NA. Wheat straw, SCMT, large squares, $38-$40, long haul, $35. NMT, large squares, NA, large rounds, NA. Wheat hay, large rounds, $120. Cornstalk, large rounds, $45-$75.
In Wyoming, western Nebraska and western South Dakota, prices were mostly steady with demand light in all regions. Producers indicate movement of hay throughout Wyoming, but little to no movement in South Dakota.
Eastern Wyoming—Supreme alfalfa, large squares, $200 delivered. No reported quotes for other classes of hay.
Central/western Wyoming—Utility alfalfa grass mix, large squares, $85. Good native grass, large squares, $75. Good forage oats, large squares, $75. No reported quotes for other classes of hay.
Western Nebraska—Good alfalfa, large squares, $135. Ground and delivered, $135. Good wheat straw, large squares, $60. No reported quotes for other classes of hay.
Western South Dakota—No reported quotes for other classes of hay.
In Colorado, prices were steady. Activity light and demand good in all classes.
Northeast—Premium, large squares, $245, small lot, small squares, $289. Premium orchard grass, small squares, $310-$341, small lot. Premium alfalfa orchard, large squares, $245. No reported quotes for all other classes of hay.
Southeast—Supreme alfalfa, small squares, $220-$230; good, small squares, $190. Premium grass, small squares, $253, retail. Good triticale, large squares, $120. Good sorghum sudan, rounds, $75. No reported quotes for other classes of hay.
San Luis Valley—Premium alfalfa, small squares, $210. Good grass, large squares, $150. No reported quotes for other classes.
Southwest—Premium grass, small squares, $265, retail. Premium orchard, small squares, $289. No reported quotes from all other classes of hay.
Mountains/northwest—Good grass, large squares, $150, small squares, $180. No reported quotes for all other classes of hay.
In Missouri, hay movement remains slow, supplies are moderate, demand is light and prices are steady.
Supreme alfalfa, RFV 185 $180-$250; premium, RFV 170-180, $150-$180; good, RFV 150-170 $120-$160, small squares $4.50-$5/bale; fair, RFV 130-150, $100-$120. Good mixed grass hay, $75-$100, small squares, $3-$4.50/bale, some alfalfa/grass mix. Fair/good mixed grass hay, $50-$80, small squares, $2.50-$3.50. Fair mixed grass hay, large rounds, $20-$35/bale. Good bromegrass, $100-$150; fair/good, $50-$80. Wheat straw, small squares, $3-$6/bale.
In Oklahoma, alfalfa trade and movement light to mostly moderate. Demand was moderate to good alfalfa, light to moderate for grass hay. Alfalfa prices steady to $5 higher.
Central—Premium alfalfa, large squares, $125-$140, small squares, $10-$12.50/bale; good, large squares, $100-$120; fair/good, round bales, few large squares, $80-$100. Good bermuda grass hay, 4 x 5 bales, $25-$45/bale, 5 x 6 bales, $40-$60/bale. Mixed grass, 4 x 5, rounds, $20-$40/bale. Bermuda grass, small squares, $7.50-$9/bale.
Eastern—Premium alfalfa, large squares, $125-$135; good, large squares, $100-$120. Mixed grass hay, 5 x 6 bales, $30-$50. Good bermuda 5 x 6 bales, $50-$65/bale. Mixed grass, 4 x 5 bales, $25-$40/bale, small squares, good mixed grass or bermuda, $4-$6/bale.
Western—Premium alfalfa, large squares, few sales $130-$140; good, $100-$120. Grinding alfalfa, $60. Good wheat hay, 5 x 6 bales, mostly $50/bale, $80/ton. Good bermuda horse quality, $65-$70/bale in 5 x 6 bales, good bermuda cow hay, 5 x 6 bales, $45-$60/bale; 4 x 5 bales mixed grass, $35-$45/bale, 5 x 6 bales wheat straw, $40-$45/bale.
In Texas, hay traded mostly steady to firm as demand increased and supply decreased.
Panhandle/High Plains—Premium/supreme alfalfa, large squares, delivered, $180-$230, large rounds, 1200 lbs., delivered, $90/bale; good/premium, large squares, delivered, $150-$180, small bales delivered, $231-$288.75. Ground alfalfa, delivered to feedlots, $155-$165, calf, $165-$170, brown, $140. Good/premium coastal bermuda, large rounds, delivered $130-$180. Wheat hay, large bales, delivered, $135. Oat hay, large bales, delivered, $80, 1200 lb. rounds, $150. Bluestem, large bales, delivered, $95. Peanut, large bales, delivered, $85. Hay grazer, large bales, delivered, $94-$116.
Far west Texas/Trans Pecos—Premium/supreme alfalfa, small squares, delivered local or FOB, $250-$330, large squares, delivered, $190-$240, large squares, FOB, $170-$220; good/premium, large squares, delivered, $170-$190, large squares, FOB, $140-$170; fair/good, large squares, FOB, $135-$140.
North/central/east—Premium/supreme alfalfa, large squares, delivered, $235-$250; good/premium, large squares, delivered, $210-$235. Good/premium coastal bermuda, small squares, FOB, $231-$265, large rounds, FOB $100-$120; fair/good, small squares, FOB, $198, large rounds, $80-$100.
South—Good/premium coastal bermuda, small squares, FOB, $231-$265, large rounds, FOB and delivered locally, $100-$140; fair/good, small squares, FOB, $165-$198. Grass Mix, large rounds, FOB, $80.